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7. Fatty fish

Incorporating fish into the diet two or three times per week can lower LDL cholesterol in two ways. First, eating more fish usually means eating less red meat, which contains saturated fats that boost LDL. Second, fish and seafood are rich in omega-3 fatty acids that increase HDL, lower LDL, and reduce triglycerides. They can also prevent abnormal heart rhythms and reduce the risk of inflammation and stroke. Salmon and mackerels are excellent sources of omega-3s. Baked broiled, or grilled fish is healthier than fried.

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This site offers information designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on any information on this site as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or as a substitute for, professional counseling care, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other healthcare professional.