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Being pregnant is supposed to be the happiest nine months of your life. Often, it is. However, with that immense amount of happiness comes a lot of responsibility. You have to pay attention to your diet, the way of life and general treatment of your own body. Nevertheless, there are things that you can't prevent. One of such pregnancy occurrences is Braxton Hicks contractions. Many future mothers hear this medical term being thrown around, but don't know what it means. It's high time we clarified what it signifies. Braxton Hicks contractions are what we usually call false labor. They are sporadic contractions of the uterus. Most often, they start around the second trimester of every pregnancy. What is their purpose, anyway? Braxton Hicks contractions are the body's natural way of preparing for childbirth. By contracting the uterine muscles, your body practices for delivery. Most expecting mother never sees them coming and get scared when they happen. Because the contractions are so realistic, women think that it is about to deliver.

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1. Stress

Of course, thinking you may deliver prematurely is a worrying occurrence. This may lead to periods of stressing out and being paranoid about your health. It doesn't have to be this way. If you feel any sort of contractions doesn't hesitate to visit your doctors. Many women assume that they doctors will judge them for coming when nothing is really wrong. This isn't true, as it is the doctor's job to dispel false assumption about health. Ask for a checkup and listen to your gynecologist as he explains the contractions to you. You should feel much better.

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Disclaimer

This site offers information designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on any information on this site as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or as a substitute for, professional counseling care, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional.