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An infected black-legged or deer tick can transmit the bacteria through its saliva. If you live near grassy or wooded areas or spend time outdoors in places where ticks are prevalent, you have a greater chance of getting bitten by a tick carrying the bacteria that cause Lyme disease. Tick bites often result in small, red bumps at the bite location. While this bump may last for several days, this is normal and not necessarily a sign of Lyme disease. The infected tick has to attach and feed for at least 36 hours to transmit the disease to its host. Those infected with the Lyme disease bacteria develop mild symptoms that gradually worsen.

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1. A Rash

The first sign of Lyme disease is a rash that may appear anywhere from three days up to a month after the tick bite; on average, the rash shows up about a week after infection. Over time, this redness can expand to as much as a foot in diameter. As it enlarges, the rash may fade in the middle, creating a bulls-eye target. Although some people do not present with this symptom of Lyme disease, about 80 percent of infected persons develop a rash. Medically known as Erythema migrans (EM), it might be warm to the touch, but not painful or itchy. One or mulptiple EMs can appear anywhere on the body. 

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