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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease, is a disease of the nervous system. It weakens the muscles and also affects the nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. ALS is very rare. Only about 20,000 cases are diagnosed every year. While it is treatable, there is no cure. As the disease progresses, motor neurons die away due to lack of nourishment. The brain loses its ability to initiate and even control movement. This often results in the loss of the ability to eat, speak, move and even breathe. Symptoms may differ between patients with ALS.

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1. Coordination

Loss of coordination is one of the first warning signs that an ALS patient typically experiences. Hand-eye coordination loss may start off slowly, with something as simple as not being able to grasp a hairbrush. As time progresses, coordination worsens, and the frequency of its episodes speeds up. This initial symptom may last for months before other more serious symptoms become noticeable.

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