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Sitting and enjoying your morning breakfast, and your furry friend is looking back with puppy dog eyes, begging for a morsel from your table. Can your dog eat eggs?

Your dog is a part of the family, your best friend, so it's only natural that you would want to love your dog and spoil them completely. If you allow your dog to have eggs, will you and your pal wind up with an unwanted and expensive trip to the vet?

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Are Eggs Nutritious?

Eggs are delicious and high in protein, vitamin D, B vitamins, Zinc, Copper, and Iron. The yoke is higher in calories and fat than the egg whites. Eggs are high in cholesterol and should be eaten in moderation or according to doctors advise for heart health.

Your dog requires protein and vitamins just as you do, but can a dog's system handle such rich food?

The Dog watching egg and viewed with suspicion. MeePoohyaphoto / Getty Images
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Can Dogs Digest Eggs?

Dogs are considered to be Omnivores or plant and meat-eaters. A dog's digestive system is similar to a human. However; food does remain in a dog's stomach longer and moves faster when it reaches the intestines. It's these similarities of the dog's digestive system that allows the egg to be a great choice for a canine treat, adding nutritional value to Fidos' diet. Since dogs can get salmonella, the eggs need to be boiled or cooked without salt, butter, or oil.

Pug dog cooking at kitchen. Nikola Zivkovic / Getty Images
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Will Cholesterol Affect My Dog?

Dogs produce more stomach acid, enabling them to tolerate things you can't. Because of this difference, cholesterol will not affect a dog's heart.

A dog should also be given eggs in moderation not for heart health, but due to the calories and fat content in the egg. It's more important to keep Fido fit rather than making your pooches egg fantasy come true.

Dog at the Vet checking on a human patient andresr / Getty Images
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Is Protein Good for My Dog?

A dog needs protein for strong bones, to build muscle and provide needed energy for hunting, running, and playing. Most dog foods have about 18 percent crude protein, which is not a measure of true protein. Crude protein is a dry protein, and the numbers can be exaggerated. Puppies, adult, and senior dogs require different amounts of protein. Check with your vet to determine how much protein your dog needs.

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Are Amino Acids Important?

Amino acids are what makes up a protein. Your dog requires about 22 amino acids to stay healthy. Half of these amino acids come from food. Eggs contain the amino acids that your dog needs.

Amino acids are important in maintaining the immune system, building muscle and strengthening bones in your pet. It's also important for the growth and development of the organs and tissue of dogs.

Energetic Hound, Australian Cattle Dog mixed breed dog hoping to be adopted GeorgePeters / Getty Images
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Are Raw Eggs OK?

Your dog requires biotin to keep the skin and coat smooth and shiny, digestion moving, and metabolism working normally. There is an enzyme contained in raw egg whites that can bind up biotin. If you give your dog raw egg whites for an extended period, it can cause a biotin deficiency.

The symptoms of biotin deficiency include a dry and brittle coat, hair loss, scaly skin, and dermatitis. A vet can determine if your pet suffers from a food allergy or is lacking in biotin.

Stray dog skin disease. Leprous dog. Bun_Visit / Getty Images
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Are Dogs Allergic to Eggs?

Dogs that suffer from food allergies may not be able to eat eggs. Common food allergies can include

  • Egg
  • Beef
  • Dairy
  • Wheat
  • Chicken
  • Gluten
  • Grains

If your dog is scratching non-stop, licking consistently or has a very dry or oily coat, then food allergies could be the culprit. A vet can help you determine if your dog has food allergies.

dog sitting on footpath, scratching, looking at camera. shallow dof magdasmith / Getty Images
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What about the Eggshell?

Now that you know that your dog can eat eggs, you may wonder about the shell. The eggshell is full of protein, but it also is a good source of calcium which your pet needs for strong bones and teeth.

When feeding your dog eggshells, it's best to break the raw shell into small pieces before giving it to your dog. You may also dry the shells in the oven and grind them into a powder. Add a couple of spoonfuls to your dogs' kibble for an eggstraordinary flavor.

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What is an Egg Sucking Dog?

You may not want to feed your dog eggs, especially if you raise chickens or other egg-laying fowl. Have you ever heard the phrase egg-sucking dog? Dogs that love eggs may start robbing you of your breakfast before you go to gather it.

Dogs robbing hen houses can get owners and pups in deep trouble. To keep your hound out of the hen house, don't introduce them to eggs and don't allow your dog to come in contact with fowl. If your dog develops this habit, don't give up on your tail-wagger, the habit can be changed.

Funny farm scene: dog stealing an egg - dundanim / Getty Images
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Can My Dog Eat Anything I Eat?

Even though your dog can eat a lot of different things, you should remain cautious when sharing your food with your best friend. Some foods that we find edible can be toxic to dogs. Before sharing anything with your pet, do your research and call your vet. Taking a little extra time before letting Fido indulge will show true love for your friend.

close up of a German Shepherd Mix Dog licking a rainbow colored ice cream cone on a summer day ChristinLola / Getty Images

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