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You don't have to be Tony Stark to benefit from an iron-rich diet. Iron has many health benefits concerning the growth and maintenance of your body. Learning more about this important mineral lets, you take charge of your metabolism and other essential functions. Your body stores up to 25% of the iron you consume for future use, which is helpful in reducing the risk of anemia if your diet becomes deficient in iron intake. About 70% of iron is located in hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin carries oxygen from the lungs to body tissues, while myoglobin is important for muscle cells.

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Boosts Hemoglobin Formation

When you eat a balanced diet that is rich in iron, it stimulates hemoglobin production. It also helps transport oxygen to other body cells. Hemoglobin compensates for any loss of blood resulting from internal or external injuries. Women, who lose blood during menstruation, should make sure to eat plenty of iron-rich foods to avoid anemia during and after their monthly cycles. However, iron is an essential element for men as well.

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Iron Deficiency Symptoms

Do you ever feel severely fatigued, weak or have other health issues? A lack of iron prevents your body from performing at optimal levels. Also, children and women need more iron, and a deficiency strikes them harder than men. Skin ailments may develop or worsen if you don't get the recommended amounts of iron. Brittle nails and smooth areas on your tongue point to a deficiency. If the enzymatic processes requiring iron and protein do not occur, your body metabolism can slow or shut down. Unfortunately, iron deficiency is the most frequent nutritional deficiency around the world.

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Improved Brain Function

Iron helps you keep your big, beautiful brain healthy. Your brain uses 20 percent of the oxygen supplied through your bloodstream, and iron helps your blood move oxygen throughout the body. When the blood flow to your brain is sufficient, it stimulates your noggin's cognitive activity and promotes brand new neural pathways that help you prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Make sure your iron intake is sufficient to boost the oxygen levels that power your brain.

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Improves Muscle Function

Iron improves the health and maintenance of your muscles. It's essential in muscle tissues, where it carries the oxygen they use for contractions during work and exercise. So, the next time you're pumping weights at the gym, make sure that you've eaten enough iron-rich food. Without it, you lose muscle tone and elasticity. If you suffer from chronically weak muscles, you may want to ensure you don't have anemia.

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Regulates Body Temperature

Did you know that iron is self-regulating, based on the absorption rate of your body? To maintain a steady body temperature, your body's enzymatic and metabolic functions must remain at optimal and efficient temperatures. Another function that iron performs is the regulation of body temperature to help keep things running smoothly.

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Helps Cure Chronic Diseases

For anyone who has watched a loved one suffer from renal health issues, you may want to know that iron aids the treatment of chronic disorders associated with kidney problems. Sufficient iron levels help you maintain a healthy circulatory system, as well as other functions. Besides staving off renal failure anemia, it helps treat or prevent chronic ailments in your intestinal or excretory system. These systems aren't directly related to blood function, but blood plays a key role in many necessary processes throughout your body.

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Treats Anemia

Iron supplements and iron-rich foods help treat predialysis anemia. However, you should consult your medical expert before introducing any dietary changes while undergoing the very complicated and dangerous predialysis cycle. For women, iron helps to cure anemia during menstruation and pregnancy. New red blood cells replace the blood you've lost, so it's important to eat the right amount of iron-rich foods to maintain proper health and nutrition.

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Treats Restless Leg Syndrome

Iron deficiency is a contributing cause of restless leg syndrome. Low iron levels in the bloodstream can complicate treatment for RLS, so ensure that you are getting the amount recommended by your doctor. This condition is directly associated with muscle spasms, which are often a symptom of an iron deficiency. So, ask your doctor for dietary advice related to increase your iron intake safely.

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Sources Of Iron

Iron is found in vegetarian foods as well as meat and animal products. For example, legumes, whole grains, lentils, soybeans, green leafy vegetables, bread, spinach, cereals, turnips, broccoli, and sprouts are all packed full of iron to help you build red blood cells. If you can't get enough iron from plant-based foods, consider a tablet or supplement to prevent anemia. To maximize the nutritional benefits of iron in the food you eat, consume lots of vitamin C, which helps your body absorb iron. For example, when you have a burger, top it with tomato slices and boost the absorption of iron contents from the burger bun. Citrus fruits and juices may also help you absorb iron.

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Other Benefits

Neurotransmitter synthesis is aided by the correct amount of iron in your blood. Iron plays a direct role in how essential neurotransmitters develop. This includes serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These chemicals help with different activities regarding your neurons and brain. One of the essential health benefits of iron is that it carries oxygen and transfers it from one cell to another. This is a vital role, and oxygen is required by every organ system to perform correctly.

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Disclaimer

This site offers information designed for educational purposes only. You should not rely on any information on this site as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment, or as a substitute for, professional counseling care, advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other healthcare professional.