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Dyslexia is a reading disorder that can affect many aspects of learning. People with dyslexia are not less intelligent than their peers but may encounter more challenges to achieve the same success or reach the same milestones due to their disorder. Dyslexia makes it difficult for the brain to learn sounds and process written words on the page. Research has debunked the theory that people with dyslexia see letters and words backward, although they may have problems attaching the appropriate labels to written content. When the symptoms of dyslexia are promptly identified, classroom accommodations early on in education can help children overcome their disorder and thrive.

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1. Pronunciation Difficulty

Parents or teachers of students with dyslexia may notice that their charges frequently mispronounce words, even if the child has heard them before. They may use incorrect sounds, such as reversing syllables in a phrase. These issues can make it difficult for students to engage in classroom activities such as filling in rhyming words, because they cannot correctly pronounce the rhymes in their heads. This does not mean that they don't know or understand the word, however.

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